Crapo’s work on anti-violence law prompts honor from American Bar Association

Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo, the lead Republican sponsor of the Violence Against Women Act of 2013, will receive the ABA’s Congressional Justice Award, one of six lawmakers to be so honored April 17.

“As a VAWA sponsor, Sen. Crapo has made the effort to end domestic and sexual violence a national priority,” said ABA President Laurel G. Bellows in a news release Friday.

Other recipients of the 2013 award are Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J., Sen. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., and Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska.

Crapo, who made his living as a lawyer before being elected to Congress in 1992, said in the ABA release: “I am honored to be recognized with the Justice Award from the American Bar Association. The Violence Against Women Act is an important piece of legislation that has worked to reduce domestic and sexual violence throughout Idaho and the United States. I will continue to work with colleagues to ensure we have the most up-to-date protections in place to stop this violence from occurring.”

The link above is to the ABA’s news release, also copied below:

AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION TO HONOR U.S. SEN. MIKE CRAPO
Will receive award for original sponsorship of the Violence Against Women Act of 2013 

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 12, 2013 — Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) will receive the American Bar Association’s Congressional Justice Award April 17 for his lead role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act of 2013.

Crapo is an original sponsor of the bill to reauthorize VAWA, which was first enacted in 1994 to prevent domestic and sexual violence and provide assistance to victims and families. After pushing for the U.S. Senate to reauthorize the landmark act in 2012, Crapo won final congressional passage—and much needed resources to help law enforcement and prosecutors to protect their communities—in February of this year.

“As a VAWA sponsor, Sen. Crapo has made the effort to end domestic and sexual violence a national priority,” said ABA President Laurel G. Bellows.

“I am honored to be recognized with the Justice Award from the American Bar Association,” Crapo said.  “The Violence Against Women Act is an important piece of legislation that has worked to reduce domestic and sexual violence throughout Idaho and the United States. I will continue to work with colleagues to ensure we have the most up-to-date protections in place to stop this violence from occurring.”

Crapo will receive one of the six ABA Congressional Justice Awards that will be given as part of the association’s annual effort to connect policymakers with constituents in the legal profession. ABA Day 2013 brings distinguished lawyers from 50 states to Washington, D.C., to discuss issues such as funding for the Legal Services Corporation and federal judicial vacancies.

Other recipients of the 2013 ABA Congressional Justice Award include Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.), Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-N.J.), Sen. Tim Johnson (D-S.D.), Rep. Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

With nearly 400,000 members, the American Bar Association is one of the largest voluntary professional membership organizations in the world. As the national voice of the legal profession, the ABA works to improve the administration of justice, promotes programs that assist lawyers and judges in their work, accredits law schools, provides continuing legal education, and works to build public understanding around the world of the importance of the rule of law.

Dan Popkey came to Idaho in 1984 to work as a police reporter. Since 1987, he has covered politics and has reported on 25 sessions of the Legislature. Dan has a bachelor's in political science from Santa Clara University and a master's in journalism from Columbia University. He was a Congressional Fellow of the American Political Science Association and a Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan. A former page in the U.S. House of Representatives, he graduated Capitol Page High School in 1976. In 2007, he led the Statesman’s coverage of the Sen. Larry Craig sex scandal, which was one of three Pulitzer Prize finalists in breaking news. In 2003, he won the Ted M. Natt First Amendment award from the Pacific Northwest Newspaper Association for coverage of University Place, the University of Idaho’s troubled real estate development in Boise. Dan helped start the community reading project "Big Read." He has two children in college and lives on the Boise Bench with an old gray cat.

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